The Kon-Tiki 'Rolls' biochar kiln. A cornerstone for producing medium manageable batches of biochar used in the growing system listed below...

Also for sale at kontikirolls.com

 

Or, without the cost, mobile logistics and ergonomics, a Hawaiian 'Luau' cone pit approximately 2 metres wide and 1 metre deep could be dug into the ground for medium batches of biochar

So, now I have a growing system that should work great:

1-Microgreen growing system (inside, with blue + red lights) for seed propagation in biodegradeable pots sitting in flooded microgreens trays for wicking moisture. Zone 0.

2-Move trays to the greenhouse for up to a month with watering of the tray aquifers when the top soil in the pots start to dry up. Also a good time to thin out the seedlings. Zone 1.

3-Start rotating the trays between the greenhouse and hardening up area - up to 1 week. Zone 1.

4-Plant the pots in either:

*The Permafert Swale (TPS) - I used a mattock and wide shovel to dig them.  Water with hose every 2-3 days over the warmer and drier months, less over the cooler and wetter months. I've been flooding the swales (mimicking a rainfall event) to soak the biochar aquifer and Permafert to maximise water adsorption on the biochar which slowly releases the water after adsorption.    Zone 1, 2 eg.could be a few swales near the home or if you're a small landholder, Zone 3 using Measured Irrigation with Tek line (if you can access it) with lots of swales further from your home where you don't access them as often, such as time away to sell produce in between growing and maintenance periods

*The 'Tuff box' 100 litre Permachar Wicking Module (PWM) - irrigate the PVC central 2 way valve until it's 2/3 full, with a top up when needed, using a hose or water can (with the spray nozzle removed). Zone 1 eg.the Northerly aspect of your home, such as a verandah or where you might sit in the sun

*Permachar Kitchen Garden (PKG) - Measured Irrigation with Tek line for watering. Zone 1 or Zone 2 eg. in your back/front yard, or even a cafe or restaurant

*Growing trees eg.fruit trees/nut trees/bush tucker, a tree hole can be dug with either a long handle post hole shovel or with a motorised post hole digger with 200mm/300mm augur drill fitting depending on the soil type. The same principle can be used as for the other systems using a coarse biochar aquifer 50% bottom layer and Permafert 50% top layer. Bamboo stakes and hemp bioplastic tree guards could be placed around the tree seedling for protection from wind and animals plus creating a slightly humid micro-climate for growing. Zone 3 or Zone 4.

 

What about agroforestry?

So, there's a high tech system for agroforestry:

-Kon-Tiki 'Rolls' (biochar)

-trencher (swales)

-motorised post hole digger (trees) or compressed air system (http://www.ithaka-institut.org/en/ct/163/en) for biochar fertiliser application to existing trees

or a low-tech system for agroforestry:

-digging a Hawaiian 'Luau' pit (biochar) with a long handle mattock and wide shovel

-a long handle mattock (swales)

-long handle post hole shovel (trees)

Ultimately, it could be a combination of low-tech and high-tech tools. Whatever you can access and whatever is affordable. Ideally, the motorised tools would be electric with a greener battery electrochemistry than Lithium ion eg. solid state Sodium ion, and could be charged from a larger portable battery and solar panel or even directly charged from a solar panel with power delivery (PD) eg.100W.

Seeds covered during germination period which usually takes 1.5+ days, depending on the seed
Seeds covered during germination period which usually takes 1.5+ days, depending on the seed
Mediterranean perennial seeds in their biodegradeable pots and flooded microgreens trays - some still germinating and and some growing
Mediterranean perennial seeds in their biodegradeable pots and flooded microgreens trays - some still germinating and and some growing
Microgreens (wheatgrass) on the left and bok choy seedlings on the right ready for the greenhouse
Microgreens (wheatgrass) on the left and bok choy seedlings on the right ready for the greenhouse
  • A greenhouse design prototype at the back of the photo (looking pretty ragged). I had to move it twice because of infrequent very high winds. In fact, the Westerly wind was so high one day it bent the exoskeleton into place which gave me the idea for the design on the 'Permachar dryer and greenhouse' page, which looks a little like a basic Earth Ship module.
  • A hardening up area in front of the greenhouse, using my Flat-Tiki heat shield and horizontal wooden stakes used to support the microgreens trays. This will be perfect for the cooler months as the Corten steel will heat up and radiate heat into the inside space and warm up the trays and seedlings from below. The Corten PWM rectangular box design could also be used for this purpose using the key/slot system employed in the Carbon V2 and V3 biochar kiln. 
  • The Permafert swale. At the bottom of the photo, with happy sunchokes
The 'Tuff box' Permachar Wicking Module (PWM)
The 'Tuff box' Permachar Wicking Module (PWM)
The Permachar Kitchen Garden (PKG)
The Permachar Kitchen Garden (PKG)